Honduras


Note: None of the children seen on this page are available for adoption.


CHI’s Honduran Adoption Program

Children’s House International is accredited by the Honduran Central Authority as an adoption service provider.

We have a long history of working in Latin America, where our programs have in the past included Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru and Guatemala. Our International Specialist has 20 years of experience working in Latin America and is an adoptive parent of Latin American children.  Children’s House works with a reputable law firm well versed in the international adoption process. We believe that consistent in person contact with the authorities and representatives is very important to insure a smoother process for the families.

Honduras is not a party to The Hague Treaty on international adoptions. Children’s House works directly with DINAF (Direcciόn de Ninez, Adolescencia y Familia) who is Honduras’ federal social services and also their Central Authority. We feel privileged and hope to help many waiting Honduran children find their forever families. We are anxious to help answer any questions you may have about this program.

Why Adopt from Honduras?

Honduras is one of one of the poorest countries in Central America and many have had the opportunity to visit this beautiful country with mission and humanitarian aid groups. Many Honduran children have become victims of poverty as families struggle to provide for them. This has led to many being abandoned or relinquished to government care. This has pushed the number of children being cared for in orphanages and foster care to an all-time high.

Why Children’s House International?

There are a lot of good people working in adoption. What makes CHI different? We promise attention to detail – we’ll be spending the hours on the telephone and computer with Honduras while you prepare your child’s new room. We’ll make sure your paperwork is in order so your approvals happen as smoothly as possible. We will be there to answer your questions and always get back to you as quickly as possible. We will point you in the direction of useful resources to help in your planning – things like Honduras adoption Internet groups, books and language resources, qualified specialists in International adoption to answer your medical and developmental questions, and more. And when it comes time to travel, we’ll arm you with all the information you need to make your trip both successful and pleasurable. Lastly, we won’t make you bring large sums of cash with you when you travel. All funds for the adoption can be handled through CHI here in the US. Our goal is to make your adoption experience as smooth and enjoyable as possible. Children’s House International is proud of its reputation. We would be happy to answer all your questions.

Adoption Forms and Fees

For more information, including our sample application, agency retainer agreement and financial agreements and statistical information click here.

For more information email: inquiry@chiadopt.org

Adoption Process

Once you have decided to adopt you will be anxious to get started with the paperwork part of the process.

Steps to an International Adoption from Honduras:

    1. Complete an intake call with the International Specialist. This is to verify that you qualify for the Honduras program and answer any additional questions you might have.
    2. Complete your application on DocuSign. The DocuSign packet will be sent to you by email as soon as you decide to begin. You may review the application documents on our document site.
    3. Begin your Home Study Take Adoption Education Courses and read suggested educational materials. If you live in Washington, Utah, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Texas or Florida, a CHI social worker will complete your home study. If you live outside these states, we will help you find a local agency social worker to prepare your home study. It is a requirement that your home study be completed by an agency who is Hague accredited. The social worker completing your home study will visit you and your family, conduct thorough interviews, education your family on adoption issues, review the required paperwork (birth certificates, marriage license, divorce decrees, etc) and then prepare a detailed report. These reports are typically between 7-10 pages in length.
    4. File the I-600A with USCIS.Once your home study is complete, you will file form I600A, along with other supporting documents with U.S. Citizenship and Immigrations Services (USCIS). During this process, which typically takes 2-3 months from start to finish, you and your spouse will be fingerprinted through the FBI and the home study and other documents will be reviewed by USCIS. Your approval will be mailed to you. This approval is one of the requirements in order for your adopted child to obtain a visa and be able to enter the U.S. Also, if you don’t already have them, obtain your passports. If you already have them make sure they will not expire during your adoption process.
    5. Gather Dossier Documents and Send to CHIThe dossier is a collection of all the required paperwork for your adoption file that Honduran government will review. CHI will send you detailed instructions on dossier preparation at the beginning. This can take anywhere from several weeks to months to compile.

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    1. Your completed dossier will be sent to Honduras for translation and authentication seals by our in country attorney and staff. It will then be submitted to DINAF (Direcciόn de Ninez, Adolescencia y Familia) for their review and approval. Once it is approved, you will be entered in to a national waiting list for a referral. Although the time line from this point until referral is hard to predict, in general it can take 1 to 2 years, depending on how flexible you are with the age of child, special needs, etc. Adopting a child with no special needs under the age of 4 most likely will result in a longer wait time.

Here is a breakdown of approximate wait times for referral once your dossier is official entered on to the list.

      • Child 2 to 7 years – approximately 18 to 36 months
      • Two siblings 2 to 7 – approximately 18 to 36 months
      • Three or more siblings or children over 7 years – approximately 12- 18 months

If one adoptive parent has Honduran citizenship, these wait time may be greatly reduced – depending on age of child.

Please note that time frames may vary on a case-by-case basis and are subject to change.

    1. DINAF provides the referral to CHI and their Social Services Supervisor sends to the family.
    2. Both parents must travel to Honduras. If the child is not from Tegucigalpa, the family will travel to the city the child lives in to meet and spend some time with them.

Three short trips are required*.

The first trip is for approximately 5-10 days. During this time the adoptive parents will meet their child and spend a few days at DINAF completing interviews and undergoing a psychological examination. They will then go to court to file for a birth certificate. Both parents are required meet the child and be present for this trip.

The second is for approximately 5-7 days and comes 2 to 4 months after the first trip. Adoptive parents will be completing and signing paperwork. Both parents are required for this trip.

The third trip* is approximately 8-14 days and comes about a month after the second trip. During this final trip the court process will be completed; adoptive parents will take custody of their child; and the U.S. visa will be completed so the child can be brought home. Both parents are needed but one can return home once the child’s passport is obtained. The remaining parent can complete the final steps with a power of attorney.

*The second and third trips can be combined into one where parents stay in country for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. One parent can return to the U.S. after the first 2-4 weeks or once the court process is complete. At the termination of the court process, the adoptive parents take custody of the child. The immigration process at the U.S. Consulate generally takes 2-3 weeks. Once that is complete, the family can return to the U.S. with their child. The child will become a U.S. citizen automatically upon entry to the U.S.

Please note that all timelines can vary due to many factors outside of CHI’s control.

CHI will guide you through this process from beginning to end.

Honduras Post Adoption Reporting Requirements

The Honduran government requires adoptive families to submit post adoption reports at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 & 24 months after the adoption is complete. These reports must be completed by a social worker. Following these reports, families must submit yearly “self-reports” until the child turns 14 years old.

For more information email: inquiry@chiadopt.org

Children Waiting for Families in Honduras

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The children available for adoption in Honduras generally fall between 2 and 10 years of age. Sibling groups are available and those with older groups and those with more than 2 or three are readily available! Children with a special need are also in need of families. Children are cared for in private and public orphanages, as well as foster homes. The quality of care can vary.

The Honduran government considers the following to be children with special needs. (Families wishing to adopt them receive priority while on the waiting list)

      • Children 7 and older
      • Groups of 2 siblings in which the older is 11 years old or older
      • Sibling groups of 3 or more
      • Children with special needs, hereditary or communicable diseases (HIV, etc.). Some special needs may be a minor or correctable medical condition. (The wait to assignment of a special needs child is approximately 12- 18 months.)

Legal status:

All children referred through DINAF either have an abandonment decree or have been legally relinquished by a birth parent.

Abandonment: When a child has been found abandoned, legal proceedings have taken place to locate the child’s parents but they were not found. However, children may enter the care of an orphanage or a foster family due to a variety of reasons: economic or social pressures, neglect or abuse.

Relinquishment: The birth mother or biological parents have given their formal consent for their child to be adopted before the proper Honduran authorities. In cases where there has been abuse or extreme neglect, parental rights can be taken away by the government authorities.

ETHNIC GROUPS: Honduran children are from a variety of ethnic groups that make up Honduras’ rich, cultural heritage. These groups are made up of:

      • Latino-Honduran
      • European-Honduran

For more information email: inquiry@chiadopt.org

Adoptive Parent Requirements

While your adoption journey may begin today, adoptive parents should understand that adoption is a lifelong commitment. A successful home study plays a vital role in helping on your preparation to become adoptive parents. Our trained and caring professionals respect your confidentiality was we work together to educate and create an accurate portrait of you as future adoptive parents. The home study is an invaluable first step toward parenthood.

Approved Home Study

If you live in Washington, Utah, Massachusetts, Louisiana, Texas or Florida, a CHI social worker will complete your home study. If you live outside these states, we will help you find a local agency social worker to prepare your home study.

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A home study completed by an agency who is Hague accredited is required. It takes approximately two to three months to complete your home study, maybe a little longer. Some states have more requirements than others. Several post placement reports from your social worker will required when you return home with your child.

The home study begins with adoptive parent education and a thorough evaluation of your family that will include several background clearances, medical evaluations and financial stability. Your home study is the foundation on which USCIS and in country approvals for international adoption are based. They enable adoptive parents to learn, reflect, and prepare for parenting. It involves opening your hearts, minds, and home to a social worker through a series of meetings and gives you the opportunity to ask all the questions you may have as well.

USCIS Immigration Approval

USCIS (United States Citizenship & Immigration Services) immigration approval is required for all international adoptions (this includes an FBI fingerprint results). This approval allows your newly adopted child to receive a VISA from the U.S. Embassy and enter the U.S. and become a citizen.

Honduras – Adoptive Parent Requirements

In addition to the USCIS eligibility requirements for prospective adoptive parent(s), Honduras has the following adoption eligibility requirements (there may be exceptions given for those also with Honduran citizenship)

      • One Adoptive parent must be a US citizen.
      •  Heterosexual Couples between 25 to 51 years of age and married for at least 3 years may adopt a child. There should also be no more than a 15 years age difference between husband and wife.
      •  Adoptive parents must be at least 15 years older than the adoptive child. (In special circumstances, this may be waived if one parent falls within this range if the other does not.)
      •  Single women can also adopt. (Must be at least 15 years older than adopted child.)
      •  Honduras will accept no more than 2 divorces per applicant./li>
      •  Only one child may be adopted at one time unless they are siblings.
      •  Honduras gives preference to adoptive applicants that have less than 3 children currently in the home. Families having more than three children living in the home must show ability to add  another child. Children in the home must be 3 years old or older. The youngest child in the home must be the adopted child.
      •  Adoptive parents with minor health issues will be considered on a case by case basis. If adoptive parents take prescription medicine or have a medical condition, please contact our adoption  consultant to determine your eligibility. Adoptive parents must demonstrate that they are physically, psychologically, and mentally fit to parent a child by adoption. A letter from a licensed  physician and a psychological report will be required of each applicant and included in the home study report.
      •  Adoptive parents should have clean criminal history records to adopt from Honduras. Adoptive parents must disclose any and all criminal and drug history. If there was a minor criminal  occurrence that happened a number of years ago, it will be reviewed to determine eligibility by our U.S. and in country staff/ attorney before application will be accepted on a case by case basis.
      •  There is no minimum income required. However, adoptive parents must satisfy state and home study agency requirements, as well as meet the income requirements provided by USCIS https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/files/form/i-864p.pdf

Honduras adoption eligibility requirements are subject to change per Honduras’ adoption laws.

Post Adoption Reporting:

The Honduran government requires adoptive families to submit post adoption reports at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 & 24 months after the adoption is finalized. These reports must be completed by a social worker. Following these reports, families must submit yearly “self-reports” until the child turns 14 years old

For more information email: inquiry@chiadopt.org

Travel Process

Approximately 2 to 4 weeks after a referral has been accepted, both adoptive parents must travel to Honduras. If the child is not from Tegucigalpa, the family will travel to the city the child lives in to meet and spend some time with them.

Three short trips are required or one short trip and a second long one.

The first trip is for approximately 5-10 days. During this time the adoptive parents will meet their child and spend a few days at DINAF (Direcciόn de Ninez, Adolescencia y Familia) completing interviews and undergoing a psychological examination. They will then go to court to file for a birth certificate. Both parents are required meet the child and be present for this trip.

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The second is for approximately 5-7 days and comes 2 to 4 months after the first trip. Adoptive parents will be completing and signing paperwork. Both parents are required for this trip.

The third trip* is approximately 8-14 days and comes about a month after the second trip. During this final trip the court process will be completed; adoptive parents will take custody of their child; and the U.S. visa will be completed so the child can be brought home. Both parents are needed but one can return home once the child’s passport is obtained. The remaining parent can complete the final steps with a power of attorney.

*The second and third trips may be combined into one where parents stay in country for approximately 4 to 6 weeks. One parent can return to the U.S. after the first 2-4 weeks or once the court process is complete. At the termination of the court process, the adoptive parents take custody of the child. The immigration process at the U.S. Consulate generally takes 2-3 weeks. Once that is complete, the family can return to the U.S. with their child. The child will become a U.S. citizen automatically upon entry to the U.S.

Please note that all timelines can vary due to many factors outside of CHI’s control.

CHI will guide you through this process from beginning to end.

CHI’s in country attorney and staff assists the family in completing the various pre-travel requirements including obtaining the child’s Honduran passport, US Visa, and the required medical exam at the US Embassy in Tegucigalpa.

Upon completion of that process, the family can return to the United States. The child will become a United States citizen automatically upon their arrival to the United States, and the family will receive the child’s Certificate of Citizenship soon thereafter.

For more information email: inquiry@chiadopt.org

Waiting Children

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There are many children available for adoption in Honduras, most who have special needs. These include:

      • Children 7 and older
      • Groups of 2 siblings in which the older is 11 years old or older
      • Sibling groups of 3 or more
      • Children with special needs, hereditary or communicable diseases (HIV, etc.). Some special needs may be a minor or correctible medical condition.
        (The wait to assignment of a special needs child is approximately 12- 18 months.)

For more information email our Case Manager, Carmina Alemar: carmina.a@chiadopt.org

Country Facts

The Republic of Honduras is a country in Central America. Honduras has borders with Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua and the Pacific Ocean to the south and the Caribbean Sea to the North and East. Honduras has a rich and important history that included the Mayan civilization. In 1502 Christopher Columbus was the first European to land on the Bay Islands of Honduras. Originally settled by the Spanish for silver mining purposes, Honduras eventually gained its independence in 1821.

Honduras has a population of about 8.7 million people. Spanish is the national language. The predominant religion is Roman Catholic. Honduras is one of the poorest and least developed countries in Latin America. Approximately half of its population lives below the poverty line. Due to this poverty, children are vulnerable to violence, sexual exploitation, trafficking, sex tourism, and child labor. About one third of babies are malnourished. Because of the poor economic conditions many Hondurans have left to find a better life elsewhere with a great number of Hondurans moving to the USA. Many children are abandoned and in need loving homes that adoptive families can provide for them.

Many interesting facts can be found at https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ho.html

For more information email: inquiry@chiadopt.org

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